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Thema: Anhang als eigenes Chapter ?

  1. #1
    Registrierter Benutzer Avatar von Raute50
    Registriert seit
    08.01.2005
    Ort
    GÖttingen
    Beiträge
    39

    Anhang als eigenes Chapter ?

    Hi Ho ..

    ich habe Probleme mit meinem Anhang!
    Zu meinem Dokument gibt es einen Anhang, welcher mehrere SECTIONS enthaelt. Diesen moechte ich am Besten als \CHAPTER{Anhang} einfuegen.
    Nur bekomme ich das leider nicht hin. Mit vielen Experimenten und Recherchen u.a. hier im Forum bin ich zu folgendem Ergebnis gekommen.
    Code:
    % MINIMALBEISPIEL mit Text aus dem Gutenberg Projekt
    \documentclass[
    12pt,
    letterpaper,
    leqno,
    german
    ]
    {book}
    
    \usepackage[ngerman]{babel}
    \usepackage[latin1]{inputenc}
    
    \newcommand*\ueberblick{%
    \section*{{\"U}berblick}
    \begingroup
    \value{tocdepth}\shorttocdepth\relax% uebler Hack!
    \makeatletter
    \input{\jobname.toc}%
    \makeatother
    \endgroup
    }
    \newcommand*{\shorttocdepth}{0}
    
    \newtheorem{t1}{neues Theorem}
    
    %------------------Anfang Nummerierung Anhang-----------------
    \renewcommand\appendix{\par
    \setcounter{section}{0}%
    \setcounter{subsection}{0}%
    \setcounter{figure}{0}%
    \renewcommand\thesection{\Alph{section}} %
    \renewcommand\thefigure{\Alph{section}.\ arabic{figure}}}
    %------------------Ende Nummerierung Anhang-----------------
    
    \begin{document}
    \begin{titlepage}
    \begin{flushright}
    \vspace*{144pt}
    \Huge Eigene Nummerierung des Anhangs gesucht\par
    \vspace{12pt}
    \Large \#50
    \end{flushright}
    \end{titlepage}
    \thispagestyle{empty}
    
    
    \thispagestyle{empty}
    \tableofcontents
    
    \newpage
    \chapter{Ein Chapter }
    und hier kommt Text :
    \begin{t1}
    THE AURORA BOREALIS
    \end{t1}
    \section{eins}
    \begin{t1}
    The aurora borealis is one of the most beautiful spectacles in the sky.
    The colours and shape change every instant; sometimes a fan-like cluster
    of rays, at other times long golden draperies gliding one over the
    other. Blue, green, yellow, red, and white combine to give a glorious
    display of colour. The theory of its origin is still, in part, obscure,
    but there can be no doubt that the aurora is related to the magnetic
    phenomena of the earth and therefore is connected with the electrical
    influence of the sun.]
    \end{t1}
    \section{eins +1}
    \begin{t1}
    It is from the study of sun-spots that we have learned that the sun's
    surface does not appear to rotate all at the same speed. The
    "equatorial" regions are rotating quicker than regions farther north or
    south. A point forty-five degrees from the equator seems to take about
    two and a half days longer to complete one rotation than a point on the
    equator. This, of course, confirms our belief that the sun cannot be a
    solid body.
    
    \end{t1}
    \section{eins +2}
    \begin{t1}
    What is its composition? We know that there are present, in a gaseous
    state, such well-known elements as sodium, iron, copper, zinc, and
    magnesium; indeed, we know that there is practically every element in
    the sun that we know to be in the earth. How do we know?
    
    \end{t1}
    
    \section{eins +3}
    \begin{t1}
    It is from the photosphere, as has been said, that we have won most of
    our knowledge of the sun. The instrument used for this purpose is the
    spectroscope; and before proceeding to deal further with the sun and the
    source of its energy it will be better to describe this instrument.
    
    
    \end{t1}
    
    \appendix
    \newpage \addcontentsline{toc}{chapter}{Anhang}
    \section{zwei}
    \begin{t1}
    A WONDERFUL INSTRUMENT AND WHAT IT REVEALS
    \end{t1}
    
    \section{zwei + 1}
    \begin{t1}
    The spectroscope is an instrument for analysing light. So important is
    it in the revelations it has given us that it will be best to describe
    it fully. Every substance to be examined must first be made to glow,
    made luminous; and as nearly everything in the heavens \_is\_ luminous the
    instrument has a great range in Astronomy. And when we speak of
    analysing light, we mean that the light may be broken up into waves of
    different lengths. What we call light is a series of minute waves in
    ether, and these waves are--measuring them from crest to crest, so to
    say--of various lengths. Each wave-length corresponds to a colour of the
    rainbow. The shortest waves give us a sensation of violet colour, and
    the largest waves cause a sensation of red. The rainbow, in fact, is a
    sort of natural spectrum. (The meaning of the rainbow is that the
    moisture-laden air has sorted out these waves, in the sun's light,
    according to their length.) Now the simplest form of spectroscope is a
    glass prism--a triangular-shaped piece of glass. If white light
    (sunlight, for example) passes through a glass prism, we see a series of
    rainbow-tinted colours. Anyone can notice this effect when sunlight is
    shining through any kind of cut glass--the stopper of a wine decanter,
    for instance. If, instead of catching with the eye the coloured lights
    as they emerge from the glass prism, we allow them to fall on a screen,
    we shall find that they pass, by continuous gradations, from red at the
    one end of the screen, through orange, yellow, green, blue, and indigo,
    to violet at the other end. \_In other words, what we call white light is
    composed of rays of these several colours. They go to make up the effect
    which we call white.\_ And now just as water can be split up into its two
    elements, oxygen and hydrogen, so sunlight can be broken up into its
    primary colours, which are those we have just mentioned.
    
    \end{t1}
    
    \chapter{weiteres Chapter}
    \section{zwei + 2}
    \begin{t1}
    This range of colours, produced by the spectroscope, we call the solar
    spectrum, and these are, from the spectroscopic point of view, primary
    colours. Each shade of colour has its definite position in the spectrum.
    That is to say, the light of each shade of colour (corresponding to its
    wave-length) is reflected through a certain fixed angle on passing
    through the glass prism. Every possible kind of light has its definite
    position, and is denoted by a number which gives the wave-length of the
    vibrations constituting that particular kind of light.
    
    \end{t1}
    
    \section{zwei + 3}
    \begin{t1}
    Now, other kinds of light besides sunlight can be analysed. Light
    from any substance which has been made incandescent may be observed with
    the spectroscope in the same way, and each element can be thus
    separated. It is found that each substance (in the same conditions of
    pressure, etc.) gives a constant spectrum of its own. \_Each metal
    displays its own distinctive colour. It is obvious, therefore, that the
    spectrum provides the means for identifying a particular substance.\_ It
    was by this method that we discovered in the sun the presence of such
    well-known elements as sodium, iron, copper, zinc, and magnesium.
    
    \end{t1}
    
    
    \end{document}
    Ein Problem ist die Nummerierung der Theoreme.
    Fuer mich perfekt waere folgendes :
    (1) Anhang als CHAPTER => Beginn auf ungerader Seite + alle SECTIONs werden nach dem Alphabet durchnummeriert
    (2) Die Theoreme werden fortlaufend dem Alphabet durchnummeriert, mit der Kennung X.Y und X stellt den dazugehoerigen Buchstaben fuer die jeweilige SECTION da und Y stellt das jeweilige Theorem im ganzen Anhang da. ( Z.B. das 10. Theorem und gleichzeitig letzte in der ersten SECTION des Anhangs ist mit A.10 gekennzeichnet und das naechste im Anhang mit B.11 )


    Ich hoffe ich konnte mein Problem gut erklaeren, so dass bald eine hilfreiche Antwort kommt!


    In diesem Sinne !

    #50

  2. #2
    Registrierter Benutzer Avatar von rais
    Registriert seit
    18.07.2005
    Beiträge
    5.820
    Moin moin,
    Zitat Zitat von Raute50 Beitrag anzeigen
    (1) Anhang als CHAPTER => Beginn auf ungerader Seite + alle SECTIONs werden nach dem Alphabet durchnummeriert
    (2) Die Theoreme werden fortlaufend dem Alphabet durchnummeriert, mit der Kennung X.Y und X stellt den dazugehoerigen Buchstaben fuer die jeweilige SECTION da und Y stellt das jeweilige Theorem im ganzen Anhang da. ( Z.B. das 10. Theorem und gleichzeitig letzte in der ersten SECTION des Anhangs ist mit A.10 gekennzeichnet und das naechste im Anhang mit B.11 )
    es wäre vorteilhaft, wenn Du auf Dein eigenes Beispiel bezug nehmen würdest, nun ja...
    BTW: gewöhne Dir bitte nicht erst an, Umgebungs- und/oder Befehlsnamen mit Ziffern zu versehen -- das klappt hier zwar und man kann's auch umgehen, aber generell gilt: Befehlsnamen sollten nur aus Buchstaben bestehen (oder aus einem einzelnen Sonderzeichen), also besser nur Kombinationen aus A--Z, a--z verwenden.

    Versuch es etwa so:
    Code:
    % MINIMALBEISPIEL mit Text aus dem Gutenberg Projekt
    \documentclass[
    12pt,
    leqno,
    ]
    {book}
    
    \usepackage[ngerman]{babel}
    \usepackage[latin1]{inputenc}
    \usepackage{chngcntr}
    
    \newtheorem{myth}{neues Theorem}
    
    \renewcommand\appendix{%
    \cleardoublepage
    \addcontentsline{toc}{chapter}{Anhang}
    \markboth{\appendixname}{}
    \setcounter{section}{0}%
    \counterwithout{section}{chapter}%<-- section nicht mehr an chapter gebunden
    \renewcommand\thesection{\Alph{section}} %
    \renewcommand\themyth{\thesection.\arabic{myth}}
    }
    
    \begin{document}
    \begin{titlepage}
    \begin{flushright}
    \vspace*{144pt}
    \Huge Eigene Nummerierung des Anhangs gesucht\par
    \vspace{12pt}
    \Large \#50
    \end{flushright}
    \end{titlepage}
    
    \tableofcontents
    
    \chapter{Ein Chapter}
    und hier kommt Text :
    \begin{myth}
    THE AURORA BOREALIS
    \end{myth}
    \section{eins}
    \begin{myth}
    The aurora borealis is one of the most beautiful spectacles in the sky.
    The colours and shape change every instant; sometimes a fan-like cluster
    of rays, at other times long golden draperies gliding one over the
    other. Blue, green, yellow, red, and white combine to give a glorious
    display of colour. The theory of its origin is still, in part, obscure,
    but there can be no doubt that the aurora is related to the magnetic
    phenomena of the earth and therefore is connected with the electrical
    influence of the sun.]
    \end{myth}
    \section{eins +1}
    \begin{myth}
    It is from the study of sun-spots that we have learned that the sun's
    surface does not appear to rotate all at the same speed. The
    "equatorial" regions are rotating quicker than regions farther north or
    south. A point forty-five degrees from the equator seems to take about
    two and a half days longer to complete one rotation than a point on the
    equator. This, of course, confirms our belief that the sun cannot be a
    solid body.
    
    \end{myth}
    \section{eins +2}
    \begin{myth}
    What is its composition? We know that there are present, in a gaseous
    state, such well-known elements as sodium, iron, copper, zinc, and
    magnesium; indeed, we know that there is practically every element in
    the sun that we know to be in the earth. How do we know?
    
    \end{myth}
    
    \section{eins +3}
    \begin{myth}
    It is from the photosphere, as has been said, that we have won most of
    our knowledge of the sun. The instrument used for this purpose is the
    spectroscope; and before proceeding to deal further with the sun and the
    source of its energy it will be better to describe this instrument.
    
    
    \end{myth}
    
    \appendix
    \section{zwei}
    \begin{myth}
    A WONDERFUL INSTRUMENT AND WHAT IT REVEALS
    \end{myth}
    
    \section{zwei + 1}
    \begin{myth}
    The spectroscope is an instrument for analysing light. So important is
    it in the revelations it has given us that it will be best to describe
    it fully. Every substance to be examined must first be made to glow,
    made luminous; and as nearly everything in the heavens \_is\_ luminous the
    instrument has a great range in Astronomy. And when we speak of
    analysing light, we mean that the light may be broken up into waves of
    different lengths. What we call light is a series of minute waves in
    ether, and these waves are--measuring them from crest to crest, so to
    say--of various lengths. Each wave-length corresponds to a colour of the
    rainbow. The shortest waves give us a sensation of violet colour, and
    the largest waves cause a sensation of red. The rainbow, in fact, is a
    sort of natural spectrum. (The meaning of the rainbow is that the
    moisture-laden air has sorted out these waves, in the sun's light,
    according to their length.) Now the simplest form of spectroscope is a
    glass prism--a triangular-shaped piece of glass. If white light
    (sunlight, for example) passes through a glass prism, we see a series of
    rainbow-tinted colours. Anyone can notice this effect when sunlight is
    shining through any kind of cut glass--the stopper of a wine decanter,
    for instance. If, instead of catching with the eye the coloured lights
    as they emerge from the glass prism, we allow them to fall on a screen,
    we shall find that they pass, by continuous gradations, from red at the
    one end of the screen, through orange, yellow, green, blue, and indigo,
    to violet at the other end. \_In other words, what we call white light is
    composed of rays of these several colours. They go to make up the effect
    which we call white.\_ And now just as water can be split up into its two
    elements, oxygen and hydrogen, so sunlight can be broken up into its
    primary colours, which are those we have just mentioned.
    
    \end{myth}
    
    \chapter{weiteres Chapter}
    \section{zwei + 2}
    \begin{myth}
    This range of colours, produced by the spectroscope, we call the solar
    spectrum, and these are, from the spectroscopic point of view, primary
    colours. Each shade of colour has its definite position in the spectrum.
    That is to say, the light of each shade of colour (corresponding to its
    wave-length) is reflected through a certain fixed angle on passing
    through the glass prism. Every possible kind of light has its definite
    position, and is denoted by a number which gives the wave-length of the
    vibrations constituting that particular kind of light.
    
    \end{myth}
    
    \section{zwei + 3}
    \begin{myth}
    Now, other kinds of light besides sunlight can be analysed. Light
    from any substance which has been made incandescent may be observed with
    the spectroscope in the same way, and each element can be thus
    separated. It is found that each substance (in the same conditions of
    pressure, etc.) gives a constant spectrum of its own. \_Each metal
    displays its own distinctive colour. It is obvious, therefore, that the
    spectrum provides the means for identifying a particular substance.\_ It
    was by this method that we discovered in the sun the presence of such
    well-known elements as sodium, iron, copper, zinc, and magnesium.
    
    \end{myth}
    
    \end{document}
    obwohl, was das `weitere Chapter' im Anhang soll?

    BTW: schau Dir mal das blindtext-Paket an.;-)

    MfG
    Rainer
    There's nothing a good whack with a hammer won't fix!

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